MIKE NOURSE
VIDEO ART
2004
DePaul University
Final Cut Pro, Photoshop, Sony TRV-690
This video was made by the students and features them discussing the difference between being behind a camera vs. being in front of it.

VIDEO ART SYLLABUS

Objectives This class aims to explore the concept of video art through a series of screenings, readings, assignments and one larger project. Students are responsible for studying, producing, and presenting video art. Each student will work towards a final project to be presented during finals week.

STUDYING video art, we will actively screen videos while absorbing occasional readings and other literature concerning video as a medium, as well as the art of moving images and visual communication. Students will examine video art histories, structures, theories, concepts and forms through production, discussions and by viewing students' and artists' work. Additionally, the course will look at the ways in which new digital technologies have changed conceptions of the relationship between our aesthetics and our machines.

PRODUCING video art, students will have access to digital video cameras, audio recorders, lights (for on campus use), and other production equipment. This class is an exploration of the video medium and production using digital video format. For editing, we will work with Apple Macintosh G4 computers using Final Cut Pro, iMovie, or any other software available to students. Students will use video source material and manipulate it in a non-linear digital editing system. Digital video allows for the easy handling and treatment of source material using effects, image manipulation and editing.

Although we will be working with video editing software such as Final Cut Pro and image editing software such as Adobe Photoshop, software training is NOT the main goal of this class. Software use will be an important component for this class, but other areas such as concept development, presentation, historical analysis, attendance and participation will also play vital roles in determining final grades. THAT SAID, a basic understanding of the Macintosh environment is highly encouraged as a prerequisite in this class. If you have limited experience with the Mac or computers, plan for extra time to get accustomed to the digital environment.

PRESENTING video art, students will develop concepts that work around a target audience and environment. Installation is one of many end places for video art. Students will be encouraged to explore presentation options for their finals. Final videos will be critiqued during finals week (June 7-11), at a time and location to be determined by the student. Students have the option of creating single channel video or digital video in other context including web pages, interactive video, installation/projection, videodisc and DVD. Optionally, students may explore other modes of art production/exhibition.

Texts Required texts:

NEW MEDIA IN THE LATE 20TH CENTURY, By Michael Rush


Recommended texts:

VIDEOGRAPHY: Video Media as Art and Culture, by Sean Cubitt
THE EASY GUIDE TO FINAL CUT PRO 3, By Rick Young
VIDEO ART: An Anthology, Ed. By Shneider and Korot.
IN THE BLINK OF AN EYE, By Walter Murch
BASICS OF VIDEO LIGHTING, BY Lyver & Swainson
THE LITTLE Idvd BOOK, By Bob LeVitus
THE LITTLE DIGITAL VIDEO BOOK, By Michael Rubin
DIGITAL BABYLON: Hollywood, Indiewood & Dogme 95, by Shari Roman


Supplies - Mini-Dv Tapes (2) NO SONY TAPES PLEASE!
- DVD-R disc (1)
- VHS tapes, CD-Rs, as needed
- Firewire Drive (provided by DePaul Art Department)



Attendance Attendance is critical and will be taken every class. Students are permitted to miss one (1) class per quarter. Each absence beyond this results in a final grade reduction equal to one letter grade. Absences are defined as not showing up, or being more than fifteen minutes late. Being late twice translates into one absence. (Being late four (4) times will result in a letter grade reduction). This will count towards your grade so do not take it lightly.

Grading Attendance 5%
Participation 5%
Reading Response 5%
Reading Presentation 10%
In-Class Assignments 30%
Mid-Term 20%
Final 25%


A= excellence A=95 A-=92
B= good work, well done B=85 B-=82 B+=88
C= satisfactory work, did the job C=75 C-=72 C+=78
D= unsatisfactory in some respect D=65 D-=62 D+=68
F= substantially unsatisfactory work F=50

Equipment Checkout for equipment will be available from either Tuesday to Thursdays, or from Thursdays to Tuesdays. This is mainly for the cameras, but also applies to tripods, cassette recorders, or other production equipment. This checkout will occur in our classroom, and NOT in the Art Department’s A/V room (as used for other classes/equipment).

There are ten cameras available for our class. 6 are Sony DV cameras, and 4 are HI-8 cameras.

Policies Hand-written papers will NOT be accepted. Submitting assignments by email is also NOT accepted. Unfortunately I do not have time to print out student papers (not to mention that this is not part of my job description), so I will not be accepting any e-mailed work. Take note of this now please!

Assignments are due on dates listed. If not completed on time, a grade reduction of one letter grade per class will be applied to the assignment in question. In other words, if you turn in a project a week after it was due, the grade for the assignment will be depreciated by one letter grade.

Exceptions for assignment/grading policies will need to provide proof. (ex. medical note, accident report, letter from the president…)

Computer problems do not count as exceptions! Students must be prepared to deal with the unexpected. If needed, you can email me, consult textbooks, find online user groups…whatever it takes. My suggestion is to estimate ample time, then double it. USE THE TUESDAY LAB TIME!!! This is precious time that is conveniently placed after our class, and runs until 10pm. If possible, make room for this time slot in your schedule.

No Plagiarism, No exceptions. If you are in doubt about plagiarism, consult your student handbook

Cell phones must be turned off in class!

COURSE OUTLINE

TUESDAYS WILL BE GEARED MORE TOWARDS EDITING AND WORK TIME, WHILE THURSDAYS WILL BE AIMED MORE TOWARDS SCREENINGS, CRITIQUES AND DISCUSSIONS.

WEEK 1

TUESDAY MARCH 30 Introductions/Class policies
Pat Hunnel w/policies.
Equipment Overview


THURSDAY APRIL 1 Video Art and Humor
American Psycho(drama): Sigmund Freud vs. Henry Ford


Assignment : Secure class supplies and turn in all authorization forms.
Confirm email address with Instructor.
Read New Media Introduction (pp 1-35) for next Thursday (April 8)

WEEK 2


TUESDAY APRIL6 Digital Video Cameras

Assignment: In-Camera Project, Due next Tuesday (April 13)


THURDAY APRIL 8 New Media Introduction Discussion
Marcel Duchamps


Assignment: Read New Media Chapter 1 (pp 36-77), for Thursday April 1

WEEK 3

+++MONDAY APRIL 12 +++JOSH MOSELY+++VISITING ARTIST+++
STUDENTS ARE HIGHLY ENCOURAGED TO ATTEND THIS EVENT!

Mosley is an Assistant Professor of Animation and Digital Media in the Graduate School of Fine Arts at the University of Pennsylvania and received his M.F.A. from The School of the Art Institute of Chicago. Most recently three of Mosley’s films inaugurated the new video viewing area at ICA, Philadelphia.


TUESDAY APRIL 13 Logging and Capturing

Assignment: Mid-term presentation, due May 4


THURSDAY APRIL 15 Chapter 1 Discussion – Media and Performance
Ant Farm Retrospective

Assignment: Read New Media Chapter 2 (pp 78-115) for next Thursday April 22
Assignment: Attend any part of VersionFest04 (April 16-May1 – www.versionfest.org)

WEEK 4

TUESDAY APRIL 20 Digital Video Editing
Post-Production - capturing


THURSDAY APRIL 22 Screen/View Re-edits
New Media Chapter 2 Discussion – Video Art

Assignment: Read New Media Chapter 3 (pp 36-77) for next Thursday April 29
(We will also visit chapter 2)

WEEK 5

TUESDAY APRIL 27 Digital Video Editing (con’t)
Exporting/Print to Video
Using still imagery inside of digital video
Compositing tools with still and moving images.


THURSDAY APRIL 29 New Media Chapter 3 Discussion – Video Installation Art
Bill Viola
Tony Oursler
Fischli and Weiss

Assignment: Read New Media Chapter 4 (pp168-217) for next Thursday May 6

WEEK 6

TUESDAY MAY 4 VERSION PRESENTATIONS

THURSDAY MAY 6 MID-TERM PRESENTATIONS

Assignment: FINAL PROJECT, DUE JUNE 7-11
Assignment: Reading Response Paper, Due by FINAL CLASS!

WEEK 7

TUESDAY MAY 11 Sound with Video
John Cage

Assignment: Print to Video Exercise, due Tuesday May 18

THURSDAY MAY 13 Nam June Paik - Input vs. Output

WEEK 8

TUESDAY MAY 18 DVD Authoring

Assignment: Burn DVD using files from class.

THURSDAY MAY 20 Video art with Film
Jean-Luc Godard, France/Tour/Detour/Deux Enfants
Video in the field of film by Sean Cubitt

WEEK 9

TUESDAY MAY 25 Rough-Cut Meetings
Cross-Platform editing
Work-Time


THURSDAY MAY 27 Video art and Identity – Barbie Dolls

WEEK 10

TUESDAY JUNE 1 WORK-CLASS

THURSDAY JUNE 3 DISTRIBUTION - Video Festivals: guidelines, surprize guest speaker

FINALS WEEK

FINAL PACKAGE due Tuesday, June 8. Presentations will take place either on campus during our designated time slots (tues-thurs 130-430), or at a location and time to be determined by the student.

MONDAY JUNE 7-FRIDAY JUNE 11






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